CharityDetail

City Harvest has taken a concept first used in New York and made it effective in London. It achieves multiple positive impacts by providing healthy food to the needy, avoiding unnecessary use of landfill rubbish disposal and providing volunteering opportunities to those struggling to achieve stability in their lives. The management team impressed us, not least because of their considerable experience in the private sector. Although funding mainly relies on donations, the imminent recruitment of a professional fundraiser should lead to a more diversified group of supporters and an increased flow of funds to support the planned growth. Our impact analysis suggests the charity is already very cost effective and should benefit from further economies of scale in the future.
Impact analysis In 2018-19 it cost £587 for every tonne of food distributed and for every £1 spent, there were 3 meals served. This is impressive when compared to the NHS, where a study found their lowest price for 3 meals per person was £2.61 at Gloucester Royal Hospital. In addition, the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions was up almost 3 times from 2017-18 with an extra 3,055 tonnes prevented from release. Management consultants, Bain and Company completed a pro-bono project to quantify the impact of food redistribution activities on society and concluded City Harvest’s social return on investment was £8 for every £1 of expenditure, up from £5.60 in 2017-18.
What it does
  • City Harvest collects surplus food from food manufacturers and retailers, then distributes it to organisations that feed the hungry in London. There is strict control over food quality, trying to ensure that recipients have healthy diets. Much of it consists of fresh food and vegetables.
Who works here
  • 16 employees and 57 volunteers.
Who it helps
  • Other Charities Or Voluntary Bodies
  • The General Public/mankind
Sector(s) covered
  • General Charitable Purposes
  • Education/training
  • The Advancement Of Health Or Saving Of Lives
  • The Prevention Or Relief Of Poverty
  • Economic/community Development/employment
Where it operates
  • Throughout England
UN SDGs:
?
Financial Data ?
Y/E Income Expenditure Surplus/
Deficit
Assets Months
Reserves
Employees Volunteers Filed on
31/03/2019 £880,474 £760,712 £119,762 8 16 57 02/07/2019
31/03/2018 £875,971 £416,840 £459,131 13 9 37 07/09/2018
31/03/2017 £238,023 £172,155 £65,868 08/09/2017
31/03/2016 £356,933 £287,443 £69,490 20/12/2016
Donations received ?

Over the last five years they've received significant donations from 4 grant making charities totalling £119,800

Amount/
When
Donor To be used for
£15,000
10/12/2019
The EQ Foundation Big Give Christmas Challenge 2019
£10,000
03/10/2018
Woodward Charitable Trust Towards extending the reach and collect service. This will continue from initial grant WCT2378.
£15,000
30/09/2018
Garfield Weston Foundation Eliminating Food Waste and Food Poverty in London
£79,800
31/08/2018
City Bridge Trust £79,800 over three years (£25,800; £26,600; £27,400) for the post of Senior Warehouse Operative (40 hours per week).
How effective is it?
Food Redistribution Programme

Description: City Harvest collects surplus food from retailers, wholesalers, restaurants and manufacturers to distribute to community programmes that serve meals to vulnerable people. A food rescue facility in Acton provides the space required to accept and process fresh food donations. The depot has an industrial walk in chiller and freezer units with capacity to accommodate surges in food volumes. CH entered into a five-year lease agreement for the premises in March 2017. There may be scope to acquire further units on this site in the future. Logistics technology helps to route drivers and provides real-time impact data on food rescue efforts, allowing more than 150 community partners to serve food to vulnerable people each day. This provides social and environmental return by improving academic outcomes in children, enabling healthier diets in adults returning to employment and reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Businesses providing donations of food and/or funding include Morrisons, Amazon, Whole Foods, Charlie Bigham’s, Sainsburys, Marks & Spencer, Innocent Drinks and New Covent Garden Market, and vehicles were made available by Vauxhall. In 2019, the size of the CH delivery fleet was 9 vans for most of the year. They sold 3 of their 10 year old vehicles and purchased 2 nearly new Mercedes Sprinter vans using funds donated by the Street Smart Foundation and Morrisons, and 1 additional van was donated by Charlie Bigham’s.

Objectives: To reduce food insecurity across London by efficiently diverting nutritious, edible surplus commercial food from waste and redistributing it to organisations feeding the hungry

Beneficiaries: The homeless, disadvantaged children and young people, victims of domestic violence and human trafficking, individuals who suffer from mental illness, families needing support, elderly people in the community who are malnourished and experiencing social isolation and refugees and asylum seekers from war torn countries

Outputs Outcomes
01/04/2018-31/03/2019
1295 Tonnes of food redistributed 3,000,000 Meals served
4920 Tonnes of greenhouse gases prevented from being released
£3,800,000 Retail food value saved from redistribution
01/04/2017-31/03/2018
491 Tonnes of food redistributed1,100,000 Meals served
1865 Tonnes of greenhouse gases prevented from being released
£1,447,565 Retail food value saved from redistribution
01/04/2016-31/03/2017
276 Tonnes of food redistributed 640,000 Meals served
1049 Tonnes of greenhouse gases prevented from being released
£814,200 Retail food value saved from redistribution
01/04/2015-30/03/2016
79 Tonnes of food redistributed
160 Tonnes of greenhouse gases prevented from being released
£233,050 Retail food value saved from redistribution
Documents
City Harvest Annual Report 2018 Programme Report Download Document
City Harvest Annual Report 2017 Programme Report Download Document
City Harvest Annual Report 2016 Programme Report Download Document
Check what you could achieve with a donation of: £
Management
Co-founder Laura Winningham has been CEO since City Harvest was founded in 2014. She was previously the founder of Peel Partners, which provided consulting services to startup businesses across many industries with a focus on financing. Before this, she was co-head of CRI Media Partners in New York, a private investment partnership which specialised in media, telecommunications, and related technology equities. Nikki Tadema has been newly appointed as Chief Operational Officer for City Harvest in May 2019. She comes from a 25 year career in the food industry, within hospitality and retail. Her experience in a leadership capacity includes Brand Manager for M&S, Head of Food and Drink at All Star Lanes, and Operations and Development Director for Feng Sushi. A part-time (3 days per week) fund raiser has just been appointed. The workforce comprise of a mix of full and part time employees, contract staff and volunteers. The paid workforce in 2019 was 22 full-time equivalent employees and contractors. All employees are paid at least the London Living Wage. During the year, 57 regular volunteers assisted CH as drivers’ mates, warehouse staff, or in administrative and advisory capacities. In addition, over 300 employees were released by 25 London businesses to work with CH. Volunteers were provided from corporate partners including Bain and Company, Cisco, Egon Zehnder, Nando’s, PernodRicard and Salesforce. Volunteers also include vulnerable individuals gaining work experience and rebuilding lives, including the homeless, those with mental and physical disabilities and ex-offenders transitioning back into productive lives. CH is aware of the potential instability of working with volunteers from these backgrounds but is confident the value of work outweighs the risk involved and have not had any incidents to date. CH have stated that for some volunteers the few hours they spend at the warehouse and on deliveries may be the main constant in their lives each day, which makes this argument even more compelling.
Governance
Trustees (7)
  • Kathleen Street Bs, Jd
  • Stephen Winningham Ba, Mba
  • Patrick Street Ba, Jd
  • Luke Withnell
  • Alice Mary Cleoniki Avis MBE
  • Todd Brooks Benjamin
  • Victoria Heffer
Main office

Unit 22
Acton Park Estate
The Vale
London
W3 7QE

Legal constitution
  • UK Charity, number: 1163055
  • First registered on 07/08/2015
Objectives

THE OBJECTS OF THE CHARITY ARE, FOR THE PUBLIC BENEFIT, ALL PURPOSES WHICH ARE RECOGNISED AS EXCLUSIVELY CHARITABLE UNDER THE LAWS OF EVERY PART OF THE UNITED KINGDOM, INCLUDING: - THE PREVENTION AND RELIEF OF POVERTY; - THE ADVANCEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPROVEMENT; - THE ADVANCEMENT OF THE EFFECTIVE USE OF RESOURCES FOR CHARITABLE PURPOSES BY CHARITIES, NGOS AND OTHER ORGANISATIONS; - THE PROVISION OF EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES TO WAR VETERANS TO SUPPORT THEIR RE-SETTLEMENT INTO CIVILIAN LIFE, IN PARTICULAR (WITHOUT LIMITATION) BY FACILITATING THE DISTRIBUTION OF SURPLUS FOOD AND DONATIONS OF FOOD FROM RESTAURANTS, MANUFACTURERS AND RETAILERS TO THOSE EXPERIENCING FOOD POVERTY.

The board has increased from 3 to 7 members since 2016. Though information provided on reports and web site about members is relatively sparse, Chair, Heads of Strategy and Head of Legal/Business Affairs have been highlighted. Stephen Winningham (partner of CEO, Laura Winningham) is Chair, which raises potential conflicts of interest but a co-chair has been appointed to maintain a balanced approach.