Grant maker

The Welcome Trust

http://www.wellcome.ac.uk

(Registered Charity No: 210183)
Charity Commission for England and Wales
Grants made

Over the last five years they've made 1375 significant donations totalling £871,216,506

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When Amount Grantee To be used for
31/08/2018 £30,000 University of California, San Francisco The Global Climate and Health Forum is a one-day, high-level convening of global climate and health leaders designed to mobilize stronger health sector engagement in and commitments to climate action. The Forum will bring together 250 leaders from national and local governments, health systems, public health agencies, civil society, and international organizations to build the community of climate and health professionals, strengthen collaboration across sectors, and raise the health voice for climate action. The Forum will be held at the University of California, San Francisco on September 12th, 2018. The Forum is an affiliate event of the Global Climate Action Summit, and co-hosted by the UCSF Global Health Group, Health Care Without Harm, Global Climate and Health Alliance, and US Climate and Health Alliance. In order to make the Forum a truly global event, it is imperative that the Forum includes speakers and participants from low- and middle-income countries who are leading climate mitigation, adaptation, and resilience work in the most vulnerable regions and communities. Funding from the Wellcome Trust will be used to support five travel scholarships for participants from the global South, including all registration, travel, accommodation, and event-related expenses.
31/08/2018 £302,592 Duke University To help facilitate progress on a path to implementation and global coordination of promising market entry rewards, such as the PAVE Award, or other incentive models, Duke-Margolis proposes to advance the conversations and develop implementation approaches. This project has three primary goals: 1) to develop and refine technical details for incentive models, such as the PAVE Award, needed for implementation in the United States (US) market, 2) to identify broader options to support the sustainability of such reward models, and 3) to support development of principles and approaches for global coordination.
31/08/2018 £21,050 Birkbeck University of London Not available
31/08/2018 £40,930 Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine Not available
31/08/2018 £129,927 Newcastle University Not available
31/08/2018 £85,000 University of Oxford Not available
31/08/2018 £140,240 World Health Organization, Switzerland The World Health Organization will convene a global technical consultation group of external AMR behaviour change experts meeting twice over a one-year period to provide guidance on how to best implement, monitor and evaluate behaviour change activities. The first meeting of 14 experts will focus on identifying relevant behaviours and advise on best practices to establish appropriate antibiotic use through behaviour change programs, identifying priority target audiences and the interventions, barriers and potential evaluation and measurement of certain interventions. During the second meeting, the technical consultation group will be enlarged (20 experts) to incorporate further stakeholder perspective, expertise in measurement and evaluation of behaviour change interventions. The expert group is expected to recommend appropriate mechanisms, interventions and policy tools to move target groups along the continuum and assess progress. It is also envisaged that a methodology to determine prioritization of areas of work will be discussed, and options or best practices to test the tools or behaviour change interventions. The AMR Secretariat will draw upon this guidance in consultation with key stakeholders to identify the most appropriate way forward for the Organization to support countries in the development of behaviour change programmes.
31/08/2018 £800,000 Newcastle University The partnership will help to engage our talented scientists in translational research by providing mentorship, support and addressing barriers in the early stages of the translational pathway, while creating an embedded and durable cultural awareness of translation in all of our scientists.
31/08/2018 £200,000 International Society for Infectious Diseases ProMED - the Program for Monitoring Emerging Diseases - is an Internet-based reporting system dedicated to rapid global dissemination of information on outbreaks of infectious diseases and acute exposures to toxins that affect human health, including those in animals and in plants grown for food or animal feed. Electronic communications enable ProMED to provide up-to-date and reliable news about threats to human, animal, and food plant health around the world, seven days a week.
31/08/2018 £255,699 King's College London ICF extension - The role of miR142 in mucosal immunity
31/08/2018 £10,000 Shape Arts The application is for a grant of £10,000 towards a funding collaboration with Unlimited to provide a Main Research and Development (R & D) and Commission award in the next Unlimited funding round. Unlimited is an arts commissioning programme that enables new work by disabled artists to reach UK and international audiences. Details of the proposal, artists criteria and timelines have been agreed separately between Wellcome (David Cahill Roots) and Unlimited (Clara Giraud). Please refer to the 2018 Grant Rationale document.
31/08/2018 £52,092 GUST This innovative project will enable participants to use the arts to explore treatments of mental health in Gloucestershire. Gloucester History Festival, Strike a Light, Gloucestershire Archives and Gloucestershire Royal Hospital will bring communities together to highlight mental health treatments in Gloucestershire and how they have evolved over the last 70 years. Gloucestershire pioneered many treatments and today is recognised as a leader in art and health, including the current trialling of art on prescription with the NHS and Create Gloucestershire. We will capture stories from individuals, work with local historians and scientists, bringing together an archive showing how treatments have evolved, why they were used and what happens today. These stories will be curated into a performance incorporating the spoken word, music, contemporary dance and art to be performed at Gloucester History Festival. The performance will tour village halls, schools and mental health settings and material will be held permanently at Gloucestershire Archives. Medical history is lived history, and has an impact on how we view illness, treatment and recovery The project will provide an enjoyable way to improve awareness of the science behind the treatment of mental health and will create an understanding of issues faced by patients.
31/08/2018 £249,032 University of Cambridge Since 2013, the University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories (MRL) has developed into a world-leading centre for basic and applied research in obesity and related metabolic disease. Underpinning funding from Wellcome, which has provided new clinical research facilities and other crucial core support, has been central to this success. Importantly, this endeavour has been undertaken in partnership with the MRC, who have funded a new Unit, the Metabolic Diseases Unit (MDU), which is embedded in the MRL. The MRL, together with the MRC Epidemiology Unit (Dir. Wareham) and cognate clinical facilities, form the Wellcome Trust-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science (IMS) which operates seamlessly from basic science through to population science, translational research and delivery of ambulatory care within a single co-ordinated institute. The current bid is focused on further developing world-class metabolic research within the MRL through core support for clinical and animal model research as well as underpinning laboratory science at an internationally leading level. Given the centrality of bioinformatics to all contemporary biomedical research, we have placed a particular emphasis on development of this area for the next phase of our evolution.
31/08/2018 £155,000 Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute On January 1, 2018, California enacted Senate Bill 27 (SB27), first-of-its-kind and potentially precedent-setting legislation, which will require a veterinarian’s prescription for use of antimicrobial drugs and ban non-therapeutic antimicrobial uses for routine disease prevention and growth promotion in livestock. To assess the effectiveness of this important legislation at reducing antimicrobial resistant bacterial infections in humans, we propose the following specific aims: Aim 1. Quantify the effect of SB27 on E. coli, Campylobacter and Salmonella resistance rates from retail meat. Aim 2. Estimate the proportion of human Campylobacter, Salmonella, and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli infections caused by strains of food-animal origin in California. Aim 3. Characterize the effect of SB27 on the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter, Salmonella, and extraintestinal E. coli infections caused by strains of food-animal origin in California. Implementation of SB27 provides a unique natural experiment to assess the effectiveness of restrictive agricultural antimicrobial-use policies at reducing antimicrobial-resistant human infections. The proposed research will have a positive impact by prospectively measuring the effect of this policy on the antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli (an important colonizing opportunistic pathogen) and Campylobacter and Salmonella (two frank foodborne pathogens) and thereby maximizing the information gained from this singular opportunity
31/08/2018 £272,325 Imperial College London Not available
31/08/2018 £77,073 University of Liverpool Not available
31/08/2018 £14,351 University of Nottingham Not available
31/08/2018 £524,262 University College London Not available
31/08/2018 £42,025 University of Warwick Not available
31/08/2018 £13,644,589 Monash University The World Mosquito Program, formerly known as the Eliminate Dengue Program, is developing a new way to control dengue fever and other diseases caused by arboviruses including Zika and chikungunya. Dengue and these other diseases are caused by different viruses that are transmitted between people by mosquitoes. We have found that a common bacterium (Wolbachia) found in many insects naturally, but not the mosquito that transmits dengue, will reduce the ability of mosquitoes to transmit dengue and other viruses when it is introduced. Initial trials have demonstrated that the Wolbachia technology can be practically deployed at a limited scale, is stable in the field, is acceptable to communities and regulators, and is predicted by modeling to have a major impact on dengue transmission. We are undertaking large scale pilot deployments to demonstrate our ability to implement our Wolbachia vector control measures over significant population centres and also with the aim of providing evidence on disease impact. We are also building the infrastructure needed to support the scale-up and global roll-out of our Wolbachia technology. The technology, if it functions as envisioned, will provide an area-wide solution to the transmission of dengue and other arboviral diseases, capable of spreading and maintaining itself without the need for reapplication and without need for human behavior change.
31/08/2018 £25,000 University of Oxford Exacerbations cause most morbidity, mortality and economic costs of asthma. Most are driven by infections and constitute a significant unmet clinical need, particularly in non-eosinophilic disease. The 2017 AMAZES trial showed azithromycin reduced exacerbations in severe asthma, but raises several critical questions, especially, the relevant mechanisms of action, whether anti-microbial, anti-inflammatory or immunomodulatory, remain unknown. AIMS 1.To discover the mechanisms of macrolide activity in neutrophilic asthma. 2.To define how non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) establishes a niche in neutrophilic airways. 3.To explore the role of mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells and their ligands in infection and asthma. OBJECTIVES 1.In vitro modelling of bacteria/epithelial/immune cell interactions in NTHi-infected human airway epithelium at air-liquid interface. 2.Murine modelling of mucosal immune responses to NTHi and effects of azithromycin on pulmonary inflammation in vivo. 3.Characterisation of human airway cellular immunology and microbiology using bronchoscopy before and after azithromycin therapy to confirm the human relevance of these pathways in asthmatics with/without bacterial airway infection. This work will i) elucidate the basic immunology of host-pathogen interactions and MAIT-cell biology; ii) identify mechanisms and biomarkers key to informing and refining future human clinical trials of macrolides in airways diseases; and iii) explore the therapeutic potential of MAIT-cells.
31/08/2018 £99,853 London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine We have been invited by the Lancet to write a new series of articles that will draw on a critical and under-researched area of planetary health, namely the interactions between the environment, food systems and population health. The series will draw on some of our existing interdisciplinary WT-funded research and also expand with new partnerships into issues of infectious disease and equity. The cross-sectoral policy opportunities that emerge from the novel analysis will be drawn out and engagement activities are planned to maximise the impact of the series. Following meetings with the Lancet we have identified five papers for the series: Problem statement: outlining the critical interplay between the environment, agriculture, food and health. Scenario analysis: novel analysis of possible future agriculture and food scenarios under environmental change with a particular focus on non-communicable disease. Expanding the focus: including agriculture-related infectious disease outcomes and how these might be affected under environmental change. Inequality: taking a specific equity lens to the debate with a focus on LMICs. Solutions: identifying potential cross-sectoral policy options to safeguard human and planetary health. The series is due in late-2018.
31/08/2018 £99,899 University of Glasgow Resting state network analysis is a fast growing and influential area of neuroscientific research that has exciting potential for both clinical and basic neuroscience. Resting state data is normally analysed by considering pairwise relationships (correlations) between regions that are represented as a mathematical graph structure. However, there may be more complex interactions happening, for example the relationship between two regions might change depending on activity in a third region, or on EEG power in a certain frequency band. I will apply new information theoretic measures of multi-variate statistical interactions to open resting state data from the Human Connectome Project (over 1000 participants). I will represent this higher order structure in hypergraphs (graphs extended beyond pairwise relationships), which will provide finer resolution descriptions of resting state networks. I will also record and openly release long-session simultaneous EEG and fMRI resting state data, and apply my interaction measures to determine relationships between fMRI resting state networks and concurrent EEG activity. This approach will open new avenues for measuring and interpreting resting state brain networks, as well as investigating how they change with ageing, disease or more specific individual traits.
31/08/2018 £5,000,000 University of Cambridge Adaptive cell mediated immunity is one of the central components of immunological homeostasis. While the basic mechanisms are conserved the components that encounter antigen are subject to rapid evolutionary change driven by species specific pathogens co-evolving with the host and divergence of the host genome against which antigen receptors are negatively selected. Thus, epitopes that direct protective immunological responses differ between species. Consequently, translation of results obtained from immunisations conducted in model organisms to humans remains a pernicious issue. The long term goals of this proposal are to identify and validate vaccine candidates and discover therapeutic T cell receptors To achieve these goals we will build mice in which all components of adaptive cellular immunity have been humanised, building on the technical success, biological insights and health-care benefits accrued from the construction of a mouse with a complete human immunoglobulin repertoire. We will use this humanised mouse as platform to isolate therapeutic T cell receptors for acute myeloid leukaemia in which the nucleophosmin gene has been mutated. In an independent and parallel work stream we will systematically explore the Plasmodium falciparum genome to identify vaccine candidates protective against the liver stage of the pathogen.
31/08/2018 £234,092 University of Cambridge Not available
31/08/2018 £817,260 University of Oxford Not available
31/08/2018 £99,765 King's College London Human rhinoviruses (RV) are the commonest cause of respiratory tract infections and main trigger of exacerbations in airways diseases such as asthma. RV biology has been intensively studied at the level of infection (i.e. cellular entry) and immune response (e.g. interferon production). However, far less is known about RV RNA processing by the host machinery. Nonsense mediated decay (NMD) is an RNA surveillance mechanism that degrades potentially deleterious mRNAs (e.g. containing premature termination codons [PTCs]). NMD inhibition can increase RNA stability and replication of some positive-strand RNA viruses. However, the effects of NMD on RV, a positive-strand RNA virus, are unknown. My preliminary data demonstrate that the RV genome directly interacts with UPF1 (upstream frameshift 1), a core RNA binding protein required for NMD. UPF1 depletion down-regulates RV-induced interferon responses in bronchial epithelium and potentiates viral replication, highlighting a previously unappreciated role of UPF1/NMD in innate immunity.I also present evidence of deficient UPF1 expression in asthmatic bronchial epithelium. My hypothesis is that UPF1 binds RV RNA and regulates antiviral immune responses, with deficient UPF1/NMD underlying RV-induced asthma exacerbations. Here, I will determine how UPF1/NMD regulates RV biology and pathophysiology and assess if NMD dysregulation underlies deficient antiviral responses in asthma.
31/08/2018 £129,800 University of Heidelberg The proposal aims at providing specific research support to the work of the Lancet Commission on synergies between UHC, health security, and health promotion along research needs identified by the Commission; including literature reviews, case studies, the compilation and analysis of secondary data. It is anticipated that the Commission will identify and formulate relevant research questions during the first meeting of the Commission in September 2018. The advisory board will assist in selecting the most relevant research projects. Funding per project aims at range of 10.000 to 30.000 Euros. Projects and should be aligned to and cover the three agendas (UHC, GHS and HP). Overall, it is expected to fund around 9 specific research projects which are to report preliminary results at the second commission meeting and submit their final results ahead of the final meeting.
31/08/2018 £31,715 King's College London This research examines commercial brokerage of access to healthcare. Healthcare brokerage is performed by actors spanning a range of formality and organisation. There are individuals who facilitate care for others in their communities in return for financial or social rewards, and companies that broker personalised healthcare packages for wealthy domestic and international healthcare users. Brokers are influential mediators in the process of accessing healthcare, with important implications for the forms of care that users seek and receive, yet their activities and evolution are poorly theorised. The research focuses on the companies providing healthcare brokerage services in two settings: Delhi and London. These settings offer a range of specialised healthcare services and are established destinations for domestic and international healthcare users seeking care otherwise unavailable in their home locality. The requested funds will be used to conduct preliminary research, aiming to examine the trajectories and practices of companies in these settings using interviews with representatives in the industry. The work will inform design of a Wellcome Trust fellowship application and will enable further elaboration of a conceptual framework to be written up and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal.
31/08/2018 £25,000 Dart Centre Europe Ltd Currently, very little is know about how TV work may impact the mental health of those working on such a programmes, despite significant stressors that are known to operate in TV production. This absence of discussion and evidence hampers organisations efforts to both safeguard their own staff's wellbeing and to build production environments that are best able to create work which engages audiences and contributors in emotionally responsible ways. The proposal above outlines an initial scoping exercise designed to determine the parameters for a more ambitious multi-year project that will collect quantitive data and offer evidence informed proposals for training and other kinds of collaborations and interventions.
31/08/2018 £18,144 Lost Forest Games Ltd "Winter Hall," a narrative exploration game about the legacy of the Black Death, enables the player to leap through time and live a few hours in the lives of a connected web of characters. As the player explores the world from their first-person perspective, and items and stories set in that era will be surfaced. The game sees the player transform into different people throughout time, and explores their lives and the changes that occur through the years.
31/08/2018 £40,000 Academy of Medical Sciences N/A
31/08/2018 £582,000 ENTHUSE Charitable Trust Not available
31/08/2018 £117,899 Research England Contribution to running costs of the NCCPE
31/08/2018 £25,000 University of Birmingham This fellowship investigates fungal-bacterial interaction in a major human fungal pathogen to test the hypothesis that conserved mechanisms of non-self surveillance trigger morphogenesis driving pathogenesis. During lung infection with the fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, small haploid yeast switch to large, highly polyploid Titan cells, markers of pathogenicity. I recently demonstrated that Titanisation is a regulated transition triggered by bacterial peptidoglycan. Peptidoglycan sensing by mammals and plants is well described, however mechanisms of peptidoglycan sensing in fungi remain unknown. My data contribute to growing evidence that peptidoglycan, a ubiquitous bacterial ligand, influences morphogenic transitions in fungi. In the environment, C. neoformans associates with bacteria that modulate fungal virulence. In patients, Titanisation occurs in the lung. Contrary to dogma that the lung is sterile, healthy lungs are colonized by gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. My preliminary data suggest peptidoglycan subunits regulate two aspects of Titanisation: cell cycle (endo-reduplication leading to polyploidy) and cell size (switch from budding to isotropic growth). Here, I will dissect mechanisms underlying peptidoglycan-induced Titanisation, and suggest peptidoglycan acts via dual signaling pathways. This work will improve our understanding of cross-kingdom signaling modulating pathogenesis in a major human fungal pathogen.
31/08/2018 £247,346 Global Campaign for Mental Health There is a increasing recognition that mental health is a growing crisis ignored at the global level for too long. As a result, mental health is moving up the global agenda and there are a series of events in the next 6 months that will put mental health in front of decision-makers. This makes the next 6 months critical for setting the level of ambition and action by the international community and consolidating this attention into long-term, sustainable support. The global community, however, remains diffuse: groups focusing solely on their own aspect of mental health and not working strategically to leverage momentum. The GCFMH will address this short failing by gathering the community to create a blueprint for action for the mental health community along with unified messaging and narratives and advocacy asks. By providing the space, light-touch coordination and practical tools like policy briefings, narrative support and messaging, GCFMH aims to bolster the community to become greater than the sum of it parts and build a drumbeat for action on mental health over the next six months and into 2019. This proposal request £247,346.00 in funding over a 6 month period from 15th August 2018 to 31st January 2019.
31/08/2018 £219,794 University of Oxford Not available
31/08/2018 £99,999 7 Wonder Productions Ltd 7Wonder is applying for a grant to enable production of a third television episode in a series for the BBC called 'The People's History of the NHS. The grant will also enable 7Wonder to create and share a greater number of video assets with Warwick University, which will increase public engagement with the current Warwick University research project and website and also create wider interest and engagement with the BBC series generally.
31/08/2018 £365,837 University College London "Glycine encephalopathy, also known as non-ketotic hyperglycinaemia (NKH), is a life limiting inherited neuro-metabolic disease which presents soon after birth and leads to severe neurological outcomes including epilepsy and profound developmental delay. Current treatments for NKH are neither effective long-term, nor curative. Glycine encephalopathy is characterized by accumulation of glycine and is known to result from mutation of genes that encode the glycine cleavage system so that glycine cannot be broken down. The majority of affected children carry mutations in GLDC, encoding glycine decarboxylase. In this project we aim to develop gene therapy for glycine encephalopathy to restore GLDC function in the liver using lentiviral vector to provide permanent delivery of the therapeutic sequence. In a glycine encephalopathy model we will test a novellentiviral vector that offers enhanced safety and performance. This will be a key step towards potential clinical implementation of this therapy
31/08/2018 £99,999 University of Birmingham Animals must quickly respond to changes in their environment and internal physiological states to increase their chances of survival. Neuropeptide pathways are essential for generating behavioural flexibility, and their dysregulation has been implicated in mental and psychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and depression. Despite their significance and widespread occurrence, little is known about how neuropeptides work in the brain to modulate adaptive behaviours. This project aims to investigate the role of neuropeptides in behavioural choices in the fruit fly Drosophila. Leukokinin (Lk) is a neuropeptide involved in feeding behaviour in Drosophila. My preliminary data suggests that Lk+ neurons play an important role in regulating fly reproductive behaviours, and might adjust behaviour according to feeding needs. Using powerful genetic tools available in Drosophila, we will dissect the Lk neural pathway involved in controlling fly courtship behaviours, and test whether Lk acts as a physiological gating point for promoting appropriate behavioural selection, i.e. foraging vs. mating. Taking advantage of a genetically tractable model system, this research offers a unique opportunity to uncover principles of action-selection that might be conserved among species. This knowledge will ultimately help us better understand the function of the brain in health and disease.
31/08/2018 £99,977 University of Birmingham TCR signalling instructs the differentiation of interleukin (IL)-10-producing T-cells, a crucial population that maintains tolerance in the gut but also promotes successful outcomes to immunotherapy in multiple sclerosis (MS). Despite the fact that T-cell Receptor (TCR) signalling is the major determinant of T-cell fate and influences the course of MS, it has proven very challenging to investigate. We have recently developed a ground-breaking technology, allowing immunologists to follow TCR signals in the time scale of hours compared to days with past methods. Using this new tool, pilot data show that IL-10-expressing T-cells are frequently activated T-cells that exhibit biologically distinct TCR signalling dynamics compared to IL-10 non-expressers. Interestingly, IL-10-positive T-cells also show evidence of metabolic reprogramming. We will investigate how TCR signalling dynamics and metabolic changes drive the differentiation of IL-10-producing T-cells in the context of normal immune functioning as well as in autoimmune MS. This proposal is likely to identify new biological pathways for therapeutic targeting in MS. Key Goals Elucidate how TCR signalling dynamics regulate IL-10-producing T-cell development Evaluate the role of TCR signal dynamics in regulating IL-10-producing T-cell metabolism. Determine how TCR signalling and metabolism influence IL-10-positive T-cell differentiation in response to peptide immunotherapy in MS.
31/08/2018 £100,000 St George's University of London Anophthalmia, microphthalmia and coloboma arise from defects in eye morphogenesis and are amongst the most severe defects associated with blindness. Some of the genes affected in these conditions have been identified, but in most cases the causes underlying these congenital malformations are unknown. Often mutations in genes relevant for eye formation may not display defective phenotypes by themselves and their potential relevance to understand eye malformations in humans is overlooked. A strategy to identify those genes is to perform searches in a genetic background sensitised to eye malformations. This project aims at validating a genetic model that will be used for such purpose. Frizzled5 is a Wnt receptor expressed at several stages during eye morphogenesis. A mutation in fzd5 that interferes in a dominant-negative way with Wnt signalling has been described in families with microphthalmia/coloboma. However, fzd5 loss of function in animal models is phenotypically normal, probably due to functional compensation by other receptors. Our preliminary analysis indicates that despite their lack of eye defects, fzd5 zebrafish mutants show compromised Wnt activity. Here we will extend this analysis and will provide the basis to establish fzd5 mutants as a sensitised condition to identify novel genes involved in eye malformations.
31/08/2018 £134,500 Bethnal Green Ventures This programme will bring together the expertise and track record of Zinc (venture incubation), Bethnal Green Ventures (venture acceleration) and Big Society Capital (social impact investing) to innovate and try new ways of working, by testing the best ways to support and finance ventures that seek to improve people’s mental health in response to their real needs and to ensure they are people-centred and research-led. The programme will also consider how research and evidence can shape funding and co-financing models and find out whether there are systematic gaps or approaches that arise from the learnings. There will be four streams of work: 1) Understanding the needs and barriers for scale within mental health-related charitable organisations (run by BSC) 2) Co-creating mental health ventures at initial ideas stage (run by Zinc), 3) Providing funding at a beta stage (run by BGV) and 4) Conclusions, evaluation and dissemination of learning (coordinated by BSC)
31/08/2018 £5,154,996 Imperial College London The London Hub for Urban Health, Sustainability and Equity aims to be the world’s foremost transdisciplinary hub for research, training and pubic engagement on urban health. It is founded on two constituent projects – Complex Urban Systems for Sustainability and Health (CUSSH) and Pathways to Equitable Healthy Cities (PEHC) – and involves leading London-based institutions and their global network of collaborating institutions. The Hub’s principal objective is to integrate and coordinate research and stakeholder engagement that support evidence-based policies aimed at improving population health, health equity and environmental sustainability in cities around the world. The Hub, and its projects, will achieve this objective through comparative studies that involve participatory research and coproduction of knowledge among academic researchers, policy makers and practitioners, and civil society; developing models for prospective policy evaluation and applying these models to data from our partner cities; and training the next generation of research and policy leaders in urban health, while establishing the foundations for sustaining and expanding the Hub beyond the Wellcome funding period. The PEHC project focuses on how policy scenarios that involve changes to key urban sectors and services impact population health and health inequality in Accra, Beijing, Dhaka, London, Tehran and Vancouver.
31/08/2018 £53,438 Institute of Development Studies The proposal seeks resources to a) produce a series of rapid briefs (2-5 pages) on key contextual issues and socio-cultural considerations that provide agencies and partners responding to Ebola in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) with relevant evidence-based insights to help shape effective interventions for the affected communities; and b) to strengthen and further develop a network of social scientists who, as a coordinated pool of expert advisors, can provide relevant regional, national and local expertise to the current outbreak.
31/08/2018 £62,626 Open University (Milton Keynes) This Discretionary Award will advance the research design and networking activities of a project proposal to be re-submitted to the Wellcome Trust in May 2018: 'Male circumcision in Kenya: medicalization and masculinity in contemporary culture'. The aim of this wider project is to deliver a new way of looking at Voluntary Medical Male Circumcision (VMMC) scale-up in Africa. How do contemporary cultural, medical, and bioethical debates about male circumcision taking place in other global contexts - such as in Switzerland or Israel - play into the medical consensus that VMMC is a cost-effective and efficacious, gender-responsive HIV-prevention strategy? The question is actually a very broad and important one to medical researchers: How is efficacy mediated by context? This would be a very significant issue in VMMC scale-up. At stake is a claim to efficacy: medical male circumcision is predicted to reduce the risk of female-to-male HIV infection by 60%. At stake is a huge number of medical subjects: a global health target of 20.8 million men in 14 African countries. The award will fund scoping work that will be indispensable in the development of a full research project addressing these questions to be carried out under a Research Fellowship.
31/08/2018 £70,538 Open Data Institute We are seeking funding support from Wellcome Trust for a 90-day project to map the AMR data landscape. There are 4 strands to our funding request: Programme leadership We still need to invest considerable time in communicating with all interested stakeholders to explain the goals, persuading (in some cases) people within organisations to participate, understanding and documenting other activities in this area, and communicating back to our own principal stakeholders (Wellcome Trust and CMO). Data and platform review We will contact all leading pharmas in order to understand what relevant AMR data they already collect and store, details about this data, details of how this data is held / managed. The output will be as near a definitive list of AMR surveillance data sources as possible. Register build A key characteristic of this initiative is that we are focused on action. Therefore, we want to quickly make available an openly accessible online register of all relevant data sources using the outputs of the data audit. Governance proposal Although we are at the start of this initiative now, we want to set out plans for the governance of this initiative to make clear to all involved the responsibilities / accountabilities.
31/08/2018 £99,933 Lancaster University The Nobel Prize-awarded discovery of programmed cell death while studying Caenorhabditis elegans nematode cell lineage revolutionised biomedicine. Although pervasive across living organisms and despite incredible potential applications, organismal death remains understudied, partly due to the lack of reliable death-markers. In nematode worms, death is marked by an impressive blue fluorescence burst, allowing us to study events that immediately precede death. Using this marker, we found that alteration of conserved neuromuscular pathways can delay worm death. Death fluorescence, whole-brain imaging at single-cell resolution, and a transparent model organism with fully-mapped brain wiring provide unique opportunities to study how neurological processes modulate death. We will (1) generate a collection of transgenic worm strains expressing ratiometric calcium-biosensors tissue-specifically to follow individual neurone/muscle activities, (2) develop a new fluorescence imaging platform to monitor in parallel death fluorescence and brain activity, (3) produce a temporal map of neuromuscular activity in the moments leading to death. This could help us understand how death occur, when it becomes irreversible, and how it can be targeted pharmacologically to improve organ collection and preservation, extend safety windows for major surgeries (particularly in elderly patients), or even reverse it to some extent.
31/08/2018 £600,000 University of Birmingham The Birmingham-Wei/come 'Translational Insights Platform' will drive a tangible, measurable change in our innovation culture by enabling researchers with limited experience or capacity for translational activities to engage competitively in this area, while at the same time providing more opportunities to up-skill and support those who have already begun to engage with translation. The Platform will foster and utilise healthcare challenge insights from a broad range of stakeholders and experts - including clinicians and patients - and develop an integrated portfolio of complementary interventions to develop these further and deliver sustainable benefit on a broad scale. It will form a clear, valuable support point between basic research and credible investment cases for translational development, creating a critical stepping stone of skills and support to access and accelerate the translational escalator within Birmingham
31/08/2018 £2,579,083 The Pirbright Institute Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is a highly contagious, acute viral disease of cloven-hoofed, domesticated and wild animals. There are many variants of FMD which cause a global economic impact, estimated at between US$ 6.5 and 21 billion per year. Current vaccines are made of inactivated viruses which are fragile structures that can limit production and result in poor immunity after vaccination. Large quantities of live FMD virus are grown during production in very expensive high containment facilities. Consequently, there is a huge undersupply of vaccine globally, especially in Africa. We have produced virus like particles (VLP) copies of the FMD virus in insect cells, requiring less expensive facilities. We have shown for three serotypes that vaccinating cattle with VLP, with enhanced physical stability, can protect from FMD infection. New rapid methods will be developed to design, express and test physically stabilised VLPs for a wide range of strains, to ensure we can produce vaccines for the current needs and newly emerging viruses. This project will allow optimisation of commercial production methods for VLPs to make the vaccines affordable and available for livestock farmers in the poorest regions of the world.
31/08/2018 £35,000 Big Society Capital This programme will bring together the expertise and track record of Zinc (venture incubation), Bethnal Green Ventures (venture acceleration) and Big Society Capital (social impact investing) to innovate and try new ways of working, by testing the best ways to support and finance ventures that seek to improve people’s mental health in response to their real needs and to ensure they are people-centred and research-led. The programme will also consider how research and evidence can shape funding and co-financing models and find out whether there are systematic gaps or approaches that arise from the learnings. There will be four streams of work: 1) Understanding the needs and barriers for scale within mental health-related charitable organisations (run by BSC) 2) Co-creating mental health ventures at initial ideas stage (run by Zinc), 3) Providing funding at a beta stage (run by BGV) and 4) Conclusions, evaluation and dissemination of learning (coordinated by BSC)
31/08/2018 £34,888 Imperial College London Not available
31/08/2018 £50,913 University of Birmingham Not available
31/08/2018 £133,979 University of Glasgow Not available
31/08/2018 £211,709 King's College London Not available
31/08/2018 £25,479 University of St Andrews Not available
31/08/2018 £61,486 University of York Not available
31/08/2018 £50,000 University College London Not available
31/08/2018 £10,887 Untold Games In "Terramars" the player manages six crew members in a mission to start the terraforming of Mars. In order to do so, they will have to manage the planet’s resources, development of the human’s base camp and, most importantly, the repercussions on the mental and physical health of the astronauts from the conditions in which they're living. Alongside exploring the transformation of the planet, Terramars explores the challenges and stresses on human bodies, minds and social relationships when adapting to life in an alien environment.
31/08/2018 £54,433 All Seeing Eye "Seed" is a virtual reality game where players can discover, grow and engineer generative plant life. The game immerses the player into a visually stunning environment, using hand tracking to allow players to craft unique and beautiful plants which grow quickly before their eyes. As the planet’s population expands, the relationship with plants and crops is crucial to human survival. In the face of a changing world Seed aims to explore this relationship by taking inspiration from seed banks and the roles they play.
31/08/2018 £250,000 World Health Organization, Switzerland This is the largest outbreak of Lassa fever ever reported in Nigeria. This proposal aims to support the Nigerian National Research Plan for Lassa fever, along the proposed set of ten research priorities outlined in the attached plan, namely: (1) coordination of research efforts; (2) accelerating availability/ standardization of laboratory tests; (3) enhancing/ expanding active Lassa surveillance; (4) understanding clinical management challenges/ harmonizing standard of care; (5) Enhancing regulatory and ethics oversight capacities; (6) supporting community engagement activities; (7) Supporting assessment of therapeutics candidates; (8) assessing/ evaluating interventions to lower/ rodent to human transmission; (9) Coordination of data and sample sharing; and (10) integration of data management. The attached plan outlines the details of the planned activities and expected outcomes, as well as proposed Leads and Funding amounts for each of those. The latter are indicative and may vary slightly upon implementation. An overall duration of three years (36 months) is estimated for the full implementation of the plan.
31/08/2018 £726,032 World Health Organization, Switzerland Support to Interagency Coordination Group on AMR
31/08/2018 £427,023 King's College London The Human Cell Atlas (HCA) is an international, collaborative effort that "...aims to define all human cell types in terms of their distinctive patterns of gene expression, physiological states, developmental trajectories, and location". Here, we will contribute directly to the first phase of the HCA by forming an ‘extended pilot’ to implement UK infrastructure for large-scale, high quality human cell atlas experiments. We will generate a high-level atlas, with spatial resolution, for multiple adult human tissues along with matched data from human fetal material. We will then illustrate the power of a deep and focused investigation of a single tissue (skin) to produce highly-detailed data describing its cellular composition and spatial organisation. Finally, for selected tissues that have been profiled in adults and fetal material, we will analyse samples from immune-mediated disorders as a comparison with our reference data to gain deeper understanding of the pathological mechanisms. This will demonstrate the utility of the HCA as a ‘healthy reference’ for comparison with disease. Throughout, we will generate profound biological insight from primary human cells and lay a foundation of technology development and optimisation with a set of hardened and scalable methods for single-cell RNA-sequencing, spatially-resolved gene expression, and tissue imaging.
31/08/2018 £572,082 World Economic Forum Not available
31/08/2018 £25,000 University College London Primary neurulation is a biomechanical process whereby the flat neural plate folds into a closed neural tube (NT). Closure initiates at the hindbrain/cervical boundary and "zippers" bi-directionally to form the cephalic and spinal NT. Failure of NT closure results in defects including spina bifida, which continue to affect 1:1,000 pregnancies. Despite advances in delineating its genetic control, we lack an integrated understanding of neurulation as a biomechanical morphogenetic process. To this end I have combined mouse posterior neuropore (PNP) live-imaging, laser ablation, and novel strain-mapping workflows to describe the tissue-level biomechanics of spinal closure. These revealed that the PNP is biomechanically coupled by a far-reaching actomyosin network, identified teratogenic/genetic models in which altered PNP biomechanics predict spina bifida, and identified a novel closure-initiation point ("Closure 5") which forms at the embryo’s caudal extreme. We now propose to determine: Are mechanical forces which promote and oppose NT closure balanced through actomyosin-dependent contractility overcoming tissue rigidity, up to a failure threshold? Do biomechanical differences between spinal and cephalic closure account for the latter’s apparent predisposition to failure? Does Closure 5 formation critically facilitate completion of spinal neural tube closure in humans and mice, and how is its morphogenesis regulated?
31/08/2018 £25,000 University of Edinburgh Neurons are highly polarized cells with two structurally and functionally distinct projections emanating from their cell bodies — the axon and the dendrite. During neuronal development the radial microtubule array in a neuronal precursor reshapes, acquiring uniform polarity in axons and mixed polarity in dendrites. Distinct microtubule-associated proteins regulate microtubule function in neurons, and mutations in these proteins are linked to human neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms that facilitate microtubule remodeling in a developing neuron are poorly understood. My research aims to gain a detailed mechanistic understanding about how neuronal cells assemble and maintain their complex microtubule architecture. Recently, I discovered that components of the kinetochore, the ancient and conserved microtubule-coupling machinery that segregates chromosomes, are redeployed during neurogenesis. Starting from this novel insight, I will determine how kinetochore and non-kinetochore factors regulate microtubule remodeling during neuronal development in C. elegans embryos. In parallel, I will use in vitro mammalian neuronal differentiation systems to extend functional analysis of neuronal microtubule regulators. The proposed research has the potential to provide detailed insight into how the microtubule cytoskeleton is reorganized to build a complex differentiated cell type, advance our understanding of neuronal morphogenesis, and explain the basis for microtubule-related neurodevelopmental disorders.
31/08/2018 £2,818,000 STEM Learning Limited Not available
31/08/2018 £1,097,432 Save the Children Not available
31/08/2018 £38,117 New York Academy of Medicine The New York Academy of Medicine (the Academy) on behalf of its program, the International Society for Urban Health is pleased to present a proposal to the Wellcome Trust to provide: 1) general support for the 15th International Conference on Urban (ICUH) Health, from November 26-30, 2018 in Kampala, Uganda; and 2) scholarship support to individuals from Low and Middle-Income Countries (LMICs) whose abstracts are accepted for presentation at the conference. The ICUH is the Annual Conference of the International Society for Urban Health (ISUH), a program of the Academy, which serves as its Secretariat. The overarching theme of the 2018 ICUH is Managing Urbanization for Health: A Priority for All Nations. The program will bring together scholars, educators, practitioners, policymakers, and institutions in health and related sectors from around the world who are interested in (i) sharing findings, methodologies, and technologies and (ii) strengthening and creating research and education collaborations focusing on promoting health in the urban environment. Key themes for the conference are: urban governance and equity oriented policies; understanding and addressing demographic, epidemiologic and societal change; healthy urban planning: measurement and metrics, data and research; environmental health and sustainability; health care: access, services, and quality.
31/08/2018 £109,700 British Science Association Science festivals are a powerful way of engaging the public with health, the human condition and science. They are increasing in popularity across the country and unlike museums and science centres, often lack the physical, financial, and cultural barriers that prevent under-represented groups from engaging. The British Science Association (BSA) is challenging festivals within the UK Science Festivals Network (UKSFN) to reach new and diverse audiences. The UKSFN is looking to eliminate barriers faced by festivals in achieving this, by developing the skills and capabilities of festival teams to use design to understand the need in their local communities and embed it within their practice going forward. Looking outside the sector, we believe that user-centred design approach will allow festival organisers and programmers to embed audiences at the heart of the festival. Partnering with the Design Council we aim to deliver a design-led innovation programme to help achieve the objective of running user-centred focused programming that engages the audiences they want to reach. We will work with four UK science festivals over a period of 14-16 weeks to embed new skills into their teams and ultimately change their approach to programming and audience development.
31/08/2018 £39,720 The Liminal Space The first stage of the project has established the proof of concept for ‘Night Club’ a tailored, interactive installation open at night, on-site – demonstrating the feasibility of communicating health information direct to a hard-to-reach audience of nightshift workers by partnering with a commercial organisation – in this case Co-op. By continuing to work with consortium members over the coming months, we will further formulate, test and evaluate immediate opportunities to extend the model in different ways to ascertain the best methods of scaling up versions of Night Club to inform and empower larger numbers of nightshift workers in a sustainable, effective and co-funded way going forward. The work proposed in this stage will enable The Liminal Space to work with identified commercial partners (ISS, Thames Water and Co-op) to design and negotiate tailored programmes that can be delivered cost-effectively at the frontline to the nightshift, and to further develop the consortium programme to include a wider range of organisations who will provide a test-bed for future co-funded initiatives. We will also work to identify future science partners and explore how current collateral can be deployed within other science-based initiatives working in this area to inform and empower new audiences.
31/08/2018 £99,407 Monash University This study will investigate the key ethical and regulatory considerations regarding human challenge studies (HCS) in endemic settings—and to examine the ethical processes (e.g., in the design, review, and conduct) involved in such studies to date (with a focus on recent HCS involving diarrheal disease in Thailand and malaria in Kenya and Tanzania). Our approach to this project will include two main data gathering processes: (1) review of relevant literature, and (2) qualitative research, involving in-depth interviews of those involved in the conduct and ethical review of recent HCS in endemic settings (focusing especially on HCS involving diarrheal disease in Thailand and malaria in Kenya and Tanzania) and other relevant stakeholders.
31/08/2018 £99,985 University of East Anglia Antibiotic resistance is one of the most urgent challenges in healthcare. The overuse and misuse of antibiotics has driven the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance in bacteria, reducing the effectiveness of antibiotics that are currently available. Understanding how antibiotic resistance evolves and is selected for is crucial for developing strategies to counter this threat. Growing evidence shows that many therapeutic drugs commonly used in healthcare also have antibacterial effects, including several classes of cancer chemotherapy drug. Bacteria can become resistant to chemotherapy drugs through the same mechanisms used to develop resistance to antibiotics, and bacteria can carry chemotherapy resistance genes alongside antibiotic resistance genes on mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as plasmids. This suggests that exposure to chemotherapy drugs contributes to the evolution and spread of antibiotic resistance. This study will interrogate cancer genome data and cancer patient gut metagenome data to assess the occurrence of chemotherapy resistance genes in bacteria from cancer patients, use experimental evolution under chemotherapy drug exposure to determine the ability of chemotherapy drugs to select for reduced susceptibility to antibiotics, and use a novel Hi-C method to determine the degree to which chemotherapy drugs promote the spread of MGEs that carry antibiotic resistance genes.
31/08/2018 £60,000 Clore Leadership Programme We are applying for two Wellcome Fellowships on the Clore Leadership Programme, to join cohorts of exceptional cultural leaders who can engage and stimulate new thinking and development across a wide range of audiences and sectors, including health, research and wellbeing by combining perspectives from the arts, humanities and social and medical sciences. The final focus of the Fellowships will be determined in discussion with the Wellcome Trust and in line with its priorities. The Fellowship is a bespoke professional development opportunity responding directly to the training needs of the individual, which includes residential courses, coaching, mentoring, a secondment, and access to a personal training budget. Our ambition is to support professional development and create resilient and authentic leaders, who can support their peers and the sector, and can ensure that the arts and culture are having the most positive possible impact on civic life. By offering the Wellcome Fellowships in 2019/20 and 2020/21, we aim to support the development of leaders who will encourage their audiences, collaborators and the wider public to access research and innovation, and establish better dialogues between the public and the scientific community through culture.
31/08/2018 £99,987 King's College London Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable fatal disease that affects principally Motor Neurones (MNs). Interestingly, spinal MNs have extremely long axons, which makes them particularly reliant on efficient decentralized protein translation and axonal transport. We have evidence that ALS presents characteristics of distal axonopathies, with defects in axonal transport, protein homeostasis and changes in local axonal translation reported. Moreover, most ALS-mutations often directly affect RNA processing. Against this background, understanding the links between axonal length and RNA compartmentalisation could highlight new potential therapeutic avenues. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have proven extremely useful in studying ALS; however, the question of how axonal length affects RNA compartmentalisation in MNs cannot be systematically addressed with current in vitro paradigms, as they do not provide efficient ways to control axonal length. I will develop a platform to study how axonal length in iPSC MNs influences local mRNA translation and RNA compartmentalisation, combiningimaging and transcriptomic analysis with bioengineered alignment substrates that allow to obtain ordered arrays of very long axons in vitro.With this platform I will conduct a pilot study on axonal compartment -specific transcriptomics in MNs and analyse the effect of ALS-mutations on local translation in long motor axons
31/08/2018 £164,899 Royal College of Psychiatrists The Royal College of Psychiatrists has been proud to partner with The Wellcome Trust on a co-funded project with the Gatsby Foundation between 2016 and 2018 through the first phase of this project. The ‘Integrating Neuroscience’ project has achieved significant success under the leadership of the President of the RC Psych, guided by an internationally-renowned Neuroscience Commission which was established as a result of this partnership. The project continues to achieve the intended outcomes within budget and on time. Following discussions with both The Gatsby Foundation and The Wellcome Trust, we propose the renewal of this partnership for a further three years. The changes we would like to see as a result of this next phase are: That the sustainability of the project is ensured so that it becomes part of core College business with a curriculum lead funded by the RC Psych. That the recommended changes to the psychiatric curriculum will have been implemented and tested. That we will have secured external funding to assess the impact of these changes. That we will have built a community of neuroscientists and neuro-psychiatrists who will curate the knowledge base and drive collaboration across the whole sector.
31/08/2018 £83,529 Medicines Patent Pool The MPP intends to establish the foundations for its mandate expansion beyond the areas that it currently operates in (HIV, hepatitis C and tuberculosis) through focusing on the five key areas of work below: Development of an implementation plan and resource mobilization strategy The MPP will develop an Implementation Plan for its recent 5-year strategy and a resource mobilization strategy to guide its development and expansion in a sustainable manner. Prioritize initial candidate health technologies for in-licensing The MPP will prioritize candidate medicines for in-licensing beyond the three disease areas it currently operates in. Undertake exploratory talks with patent holders The MPP will interact with patent holders to gauge where the most promising opportunities for in-licensing may be. Continue exploratory work on MPP’s role in relation to Anti-Microbial Resistance The MPP will continue to explore its potential role in relation to new antibiotics and its complementarity with other initiatives in AMR. Explore opportunities for MPP to act as a centre of excellence on public health access-oriented licensing The MPP will develop a scoping paper exploring options for it to serve as a centre of excellence on public health-oriented licensing.
31/08/2018 £31,725 Arts & Health South West This award is a follow on from the previous award for the All-Party Parliamentary Group's Inquiry into the benefits of the arts for health and wellbeing. The inquiry report Creative Health, has ten recommendations to a wide range of organisations. We are now in the process of Next Steps as outlined in the report, to support and encourage the take-up of the recommendations. This phase will include a feasibility study, delivered by the King’s Fund, to consider Recommendation 1 for a national strategic centre for Arts, Health and Wellbeing. We are also engaging with a range of government departments to advocate for a cross-government strategy and delivering a programme of round tables in parliament about each recommendation. We are bringing together key organisations and individuals who can help make progress on the implementation of the recommendations.
31/08/2018 £83,104 King's College London Earlier detection of the neurodegeneration that precedes dementia is needed if we are to address the rising burden that dementia places on our ageing global population. While cognitive impairment is an important risk factor, alone it is insufficient to identify who will experience pathological deterioration and subsequent dementia. Here, I aim to harness the power of neuroimaging as an objective and sensitive index of brain structure, using an ‘ageing biomarker’ framework to measure so-called ‘brain-age’ in people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or subjective cognitive impairment (SCI). This project aims to 1) validate the utility of brain-age for predicting future health outcomes in people with MCI or SCI, and then 2) implement a software pipeline to convey these individualised predictions directly to clinical settings. I will meet these goals by taking advantage of the large existing MRI database of memory clinic patients and linked electronic health records available at King’s. Collaborations with memory services across King’s Health Partners NHS Trusts will enable trial clinical deployment of my software pipeline. Using brain-age in combination with clinical expertise in memory services will enable optimal and cost-effective allocation of resources, moving towards the application of precision medicine to detect dementia risk earlier.
31/08/2018 £10,345 Global Emerging Pathogens Treatment Consortium We propose to organise a two days symposium titled: "Cultural, legal and ethical challenges in managing data in epidemics, emergencies and disasters" as part of the 4th African Conference on Emerging Infectious Diseases and Biosecurity, under the theme "Managing the spectrum of data generated during disease outbreaks and Biosecurity threats" to be held in Freetown, Sierra Leone from September 26-28, 2018. The discussants will be drawn from a wide range of stakeholders, including researchers, Ebola virus disease survivors, decision/policy makers, funders and legal experts at the local, national and international levels. The report from the symposium will be drafted into a manuscript and submitted to an open access journal.
31/08/2018 £4,795,450 University of Cambridge Since 2013, the University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories (MRL) has developed into a world-leading centre for basic and applied research in obesity and related metabolic disease. Underpinning funding from Wellcome, which has provided new clinical research facilities and other crucial core support, has been central to this success. Importantly, this endeavour has been undertaken in partnership with the MRC, who have funded a new Unit, the Metabolic Diseases Unit (MDU), which is embedded in the MRL. The MRL, together with the MRC Epidemiology Unit (Dir. Wareham) and cognate clinical facilities, form the Wellcome Trust-MRC Institute of Metabolic Science (IMS) which operates seamlessly from basic science through to population science, translational research and delivery of ambulatory care within a single co-ordinated institute. The current bid is focused on further developing world-class metabolic research within the MRL through core support for clinical and animal model research as well as underpinning laboratory science at an internationally leading level. Given the centrality of bioinformatics to all contemporary biomedical research, we have placed a particular emphasis on development of this area for the next phase of our evolution.
31/08/2018 £228,782 University College London N/A
31/08/2018 £99,905 Queen Mary University of London Metagenomic approaches are generating a long list of health and disease states associated with the microbiome (the microbes inhabiting our digestive tract) but without mechanistic understanding. The challenges arise from the enormous complexity of the microbiome, including genetic, environmental and dietary variations, microbe-microbe interactions, and the cost associated with studying the microbiome using murine models. If the field is to move beyond association, simple, well-controlled and cost-effective models allowing unbiased high-throughput studies are needed. The nematode C. elegans is a genetically tractable model, ideally suited for mechanistic and causative studies of host-microbiome and microbe-microbe interactions shaping host physiology and metabolism. Aims: 1) Establish an experimental microbiome in C. elegans based on strains from the human microbiome associated with health, disease and ageing 2) Generate fluorescent labelled bacterial strains and perform real-time imaging of gut colonisation 3) Characterise the effects of the experimental microbiome on the microbiome-gut-brain axis during ageing The experimental microbiome in C. elegans will be an important contribution to the field, complementing existing models. It will allow me to establish important collaborations, form a basis for my future research and address one of the most important questions of modern biology: the effects of the microbiome on host physiology.
31/08/2018 £98,945 University of Warwick To divide and multiply, bacteria must remodel their cell envelope to facilitate physical separation of daughter cells. FtsEX is a key player in coordinating cell division events on either side of the bacterial inner membrane. FtsEX belongs to the same protein superfamily as the MacB efflux pump and the LolCDE lipoprotein trafficking complex, collectively termed Type VII ABC transporters. Current models for FtsEX activity suggest long range conformational changes in FtsEX regulate periplasmic enzymes responsible for peptidoglycan hydrolysis while maintaining cytoplasmic interaction with the septal Z-ring. Structural and functional data are essential to understand how FtsEX works and to assess viability of inhibition using chemical compounds. This project seeks to characterise the interaction of FtsEX with its binding partners, the role of ATP binding and hydrolysis, and to obtain structural data using X-ray crystallography. The project builds on published work on Type VII ABC transporters and is supported by preliminary data showing FtsEX has been crystallised. The Seed Award will presage future applications to the Wellcome Trust, MRC or Leverhulme Trust to further explore the structure and function of bacterial cell division proteins as targets for future antibiotic development.
31/08/2018 £753,991 World Health Organization, Switzerland The overall objective is to support the functioning of the Global Preparedness Monitoring Board (GPMB) Secretariat in supporting the Board’s role, its work and deliverables, and providing funds for commissioning research to inform the Board’s objectives. By funding an effective Secretariat, the Board will ensure system-wide accountability for preparedness efforts at community, country, regional and global levels by reporting annually on the adequacy of financing, progress on relevant research and development and overall strength of health crisis preparedness. Building on its annual report, the Board will also advocate for action at the highest levels, and this grant will support some of the associated meeting and travel costs for the Board and Secretariat. The success measures are: GPMB is established, holds bi-annual meetings (ie 3 meetings total: 1 in 2018 and 2 in 2019) and is in regular communication focused on its priorities in the 2018- 2019 period; Commissioned and Secretariat-led analyses engage global experts and produce quality findings and recommendations designed to be used by the Board and to support the development of its priorities; and, The Secretariat supports and advises the Board in developing and implementing its priorities and work plan
31/08/2018 £120,249 African Academy of Sciences India and Africa face similar challenges, both in the diseases that affect their populations and in the inadequate research infrastructure and leadership required to address these. It is therefore critical that researchers in these locations collaborate across the spectrum of health research for shared learning and addressing common challenges. Such collaboration would also be a way of growing leadership through the exposure of researchers to wider cultural, geographic and scientific experiences. The AIMF is intended to fund researchers from Africa and India for short visits in either direction to explore opportunities for building and strengthening scientific collaborations. These are expected to enhance skills and contribute to the growth of knowledge and leadership towards common health challenges. The collaborative opportunity may include but is not limited to HIV/AIDS, TB, dengue, malaria, vector-borne diseases, parasitic infections, emerging infections, cancer, diabetes, hypertension, health systems research, AMR, microbiome and general biomedical science. Collaborations should focus on a single project involving researchers in Africa and India, respectively. The specific objectives of this project are to: To strengthen research & innovation capacity and knowledge exchange To strengthen scientific collaboration in India and Africa
31/08/2018 £600,000 Cardiff University The Cardiff institutional Translational Partnership Award (iTPA) aims to embed a more translational culture within the university's academic staff. It will combine the educational and community-building activities needed to assist researchers with industrial engagement and help them align their research outcomes with industrial needs. The iTPA will also provide fund projects during the so-called Translation-of-Concept phase for projects where proof-ofconcept has already been established. These activities will all be coordinated by a Translational Research Lead whose role will be to identify clear bottlenecks, gaps and barriers to translation of Cardiff science and identify the key external partners needed to provide an external, market-informed viewpoint in collaboration with the University's Commercial Development Team.
31/08/2018 £220,182 University College London Not available
31/08/2018 £221,336 University of Glasgow Not available
31/08/2018 £95,982 University of Leicester DNA replication through regions of damage is termed translesion synthesis (TLS), a mechanism conserved from bacteria to mammals and executed by the interplay of high-fidelity and error-prone DNA polymerases, that latter of which can accommodate distorted templates in their active sites. Despite its major role in the maintenance of genome stability and implication in human cancer, TLS is still poorly understood at the molecular level. In this proposal, we will set out to unravel the molecular mechanisms of TLS. We will reconstitute, in vitro, two minimal replisomes including the human high-fidelity polymerase pol delta or the TLS polymerase pol eta. For the first time, we will employ cryogenic electron microscopy (cryo-EM) to determine these replisomes' structure. This work will constitute the critical building block for a far-reaching mechanistic investigation, which will combine cryo-EM and single-molecule fluorescence microscopy to resolve the architecture and choreography of the DNA lesion bypass machinery.
31/08/2018 £946,335 World Health Organization, Switzerland In an increasingly connected and urbanizing world, disease outbreaks are a growing risk to people’s lives and livelihoods. As illustrated by recent pandemics, such as SARS, Ebola and Zika virus, they also have significant impact on economies and challenge health infrastructures. They require coordination and increased efforts at the national, regional and global level to ensure we’re better prepared for future outbreaks. Addressing epidemics and other health emergencies is one of the WHO’s three core priorities in its new General Programme of Work (2019-2023). In 2015, WHO established the R & D Blueprint, which outlined a global strategy and plan to allow the rapid activation of R & D activities during epidemics. A large focus is to coordinate global efforts in developing effective diagnostics, medicines and vaccines for outbreaks to save lives and avert large scale crises. The Blueprint works with national governments, UN agencies, civil society, funders and the private sector to improve coordination, accelerate processes and develop tailored norms and standards. This project would allow key areas of work to move forward: (1) coordination, (2) data and sample sharing and related ethics, (3) outlining appropriate regulatory and ethical pathways and implementation of IVTF recommendations, and (4) data sharing for public health emergencies.
31/08/2018 £135,000 International Documentary Festival Sheffield Inspiring self and world awareness of good mental health through factual storytelling and interactive experiences. Encapsulating Sheffield Doc/Fest’s bold festival vision, Doc/Fest Exchange will present the ultimate documentary storytelling experiences, to inspire new self and world mental health awareness, new engagement with mental health research, and for audiences to be part of the good mental health story legacy. At the heart of Doc/Fest’s public and industry programme, the Exchange will be an immersive platform for research-based stories, ideas and innovative forms, drawn from Doc/Fest’s Films and Alternate Realities programmes. It will be a locus to bring together the triumvirate of public, researchers and documentary makers, where new shared experiences result in new perceptions and change.
31/08/2018 £2,273,810 George Washington University On January 1, 2018, California enacted Senate Bill 27 (SB27), first-of-its-kind and potentially precedent-setting legislation, which will require a veterinarian’s prescription for use of antimicrobial drugs and ban non-therapeutic antimicrobial uses for routine disease prevention and growth promotion in livestock. To assess the effectiveness of this important legislation at reducing antimicrobial resistant bacterial infections in humans, we propose the following specific aims: Aim 1. Quantify the effect of SB27 on E. coli, Campylobacter and Salmonella resistance rates from retail meat. Aim 2. Estimate the proportion of human Campylobacter, Salmonella, and extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli infections caused by strains of food-animal origin in California. Aim 3. Characterize the effect of SB27 on the antimicrobial susceptibility of Campylobacter, Salmonella, and extraintestinal E. coli infections caused by strains of food-animal origin in California. Implementation of SB27 provides a unique natural experiment to assess the effectiveness of restrictive agricultural antimicrobial-use policies at reducing antimicrobial-resistant human infections. The proposed research will have a positive impact by prospectively measuring the effect of this policy on the antimicrobial susceptibility of E. coli (an important colonizing opportunistic pathogen) and Campylobacter and Salmonella (two frank foodborne pathogens) and thereby maximizing the information gained from this singular opportunity
31/08/2018 £44,813 University of Aberdeen Not available
31/08/2018 £81,092 Cardiff University Not available
31/08/2018 £58,344 University of Exeter Not available
31/08/2018 £22,238 University of Leicester Not available
31/08/2018 £189,249 London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine Not available
31/08/2018 £25,061 Queen's University Belfast Not available
31/08/2018 £17,550 Royal Veterinary College Not available
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Objectives

(1) TO PROTECT, PRESERVE AND ADVANCE ALL OR ANY ASPECTS OF THE HEALTH AND WELFARE OF HUMANKIND AND TO ADVANCE AND PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE AND EDUCATION BY ENGAGING IN, ENCOURAGING AND SUPPORTING: (A) RESEARCH INTO ANY OF THE BIOSCIENCES; AND (B) THE DISCOVERY, INVENTION, IMPROVEMENT, DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF TREATMENTS, CURES, DIAGNOSTICS AND OTHER MEDICINAL AGENTS, METHODS AND PROCESSES THAT MAY IN ANY WAY RELIEVE ILLNESS, DISEASE, DISABILITY OR DISORDERS OF WHATEVER NATURE IN HUMAN BEINGS OR ANIMAL OR PLANT LIFE; AND (2) TO ADVANCE AND PROMOTE KNOWLEDGE AND EDUCATION BY ENGAGING IN, ENCOURAGING AND SUPPORTING: (A) RESEARCH INTO THE HISTORY OF ANY OF THE BIOSCIENCES; AND (B) THE STUDY AND UNDERSTANDING OF ANY OF THE BIOSCIENCES OR THE HISTORY OF ANY OF THE BIOSCIENCES.